DVD Forged

DVD Forged
DVD Forged

Run time: 77 min
Rating: 4.8
Genres: Action | Drama
Director: William Wedig
Writers: Manny Perez, William Wedig
Stars: Manny Perez, David Castro, Margo Martindale
Storyline
An ex-thug and his son attempt to find a way to move past impossible circumstances to forge a bond that has been forever broken by the murder of the child’s mother.
Details:
Country: USA
Release Date: 31 July 2010 (USA)

4 Comments

  1. Saw this movie back at the Latino Film Festival and this was by far my favorite movie there. It contained a well thought out story with great actors, Manny Perez put on a good show, even better than his performance in La Soga. I really enjoyed the action sequences and the ending felt right. This movie is premiering soon and I plan to take a group of friends so they can see what they have been missing. If you got nothing to see in NY or LA on July 29th, then go see this film. It really addressed the issue of forgiveness in a deep and understanding manner. Margo Martindale also put on a amazing performance and really acted out the part for the concerned mother of Manny Perez. Overall this was a good film and its amazing that it came out of the small town of Scranton, PA.

  2. It is amazing what can be achieved on a small budget. Director William Wedig has created a film more powerful than most mainstream, Hollywood productions in recent memory. Incredibly gritty tale of a man, recently released from prison, trying to figure out a way to live again. Jailed for shooting his wife during a moment of blind rage, Chuco (Manny Perez) leaves behind his 8 year old son, Machito (David Castro) who unfortunately witnesses the shooting. Irrevocably damaged from the experience, the boy, now a teenager, is living in the street, surviving like an animal. The relationship between father and son is at the heart of this very dark crime drama, and it is handled superbly. Filmed in gloomy Scranton, PA, in the depths of winter, the brilliantly stark cinematography adds to the emotional power of "Forged." This is a complicated film, as director Wedig does not really make it easy to sympathize with Chuco. But we do, because of the multi layered character development. Young actor David Castro is great in this, with his wounded, soulless eyes that reflect the pain and raw anger he is feeling. The conclusion is brutal, and unconventional. "Forged" is not really a mainstream film, and might not appeal to casual moviegoers who are simply looking to be entertained. This is a slow, intense and brooding film that will be appreciated by a specific audience. Someday "Forged" might just become a cult classic. I hope this young director does not give in to Hollywood pressure, and continues to make uncompromising films like this one. And it would be great to see Manny Perez and David Castro on screen again. Wonderful film from a promising filmmaker.

  3. A moving film which captured, with vivid detail through amazing cinematography, location selection, writing, casting, and acting, the struggle to overcome the greatest betrayal between father and son. With the help of a BEAUTIFUL soundtrack, which allowed for seamless segway from one moving scene to the next, and forced every emotion-filled scene, deeper into you with beautiful simplicity, the movie also captured the stark beauty of northeast Pennsylvania, in the hardest of seasons. A wonderful editing job was the cherry on this dramatic Sunday. Go see this movie. Buy the DVD. It will certainly, at least, make you question the strength of your own, closest relationships.

  4. Manny Perez stars as Chuco, an ex-con released from prison after killing his wife. He tries to reconnect with his young son, Machito, who witnessed the murder of his mother and has been living on the streets ever since.

    Set in Scranton, Pennsylvania this film will do little for the city's tourism industry. The filmmakers seem to have made a conscience effort to portray their city in an entirely different light than the Scranton seen on NBC's hit sitcom The Office. This city is not home to a motley crew of funny and quirky characters, but to gangsters, thugs, and lowlifes – a veritable Hell on Earth.

    David Castro, as Chuco's young son, gives the role his all. He's too young to realize he should be phoning in his performance, saving his talent for a better movie. Throughout the film, Chuco feels entitled to his son's forgiveness; he doesn't do anything to earn that forgiveness, and actually ends up making the boy's life worse. Still, the screenplay wants us to root for Chuco – but only because he's the lead character, not because he redeems himself in any way or atones for his sins. Chuco is not a hero, he's an awful human being, but the movie excuses his behavior. Forged bills itself as a film about redemption – its not. The filmmakers are too lazy to actually ensure their movie has a point.

    Kevin Breznahan, an actor best known for his bit roles in comedies, is an odd choice to play the film's heavy. With his helium-infused voice and fey demeanor, Breznahan is about as scary as a Teletubby. Margo Martindale, as Chuco's alcoholic mother, fares better. Still, one hopes she was actually intoxicated during her scenes; maybe she won't remember spouting out groaners like "A bitter tree can only grow bitter fruit!" Many scenes end with the lead characters staring dramatically into the distance, soap opera-like, searching for the profound dialog the script can not provide them with.

    Director Will Wedig's previous credit was the zombie-flick 'Rise of the Dead.' Wedig should have continued working in the horror industry, a genre more forgiving of bad writing and poor direction. By tackling a serious drama, Wedig seems to have bitten off more than he can chew. In a truly tasteless bit of editing, the father's dalliance with a local prostitute is inter cut with a scene of the young boy whoring himself out to the town pedophile. Wedig fills the movie with some obvious symbolism, straight out of screen writing 101. The father and son are rebuilding a car at the same time they're rebuilding their relationship! In another scene, a man, sacrificing his own life, outstretches his arms and adopts a Christ-like pose. Get it? Throughout the movie you can literally feel Wedig nudging you in the ribs, making sure you don't miss any detail in his multi-layered "masterpiece." At a running time of only seventy-two minutes, Forged is barely feature length. The needlessly constant use of slow motion only serves to pad out the film's scant running time. Still, by the time the end credits roll, you'll have spent too much time with these characters and with this film.

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