DVD Ismael

DVD Ismael
DVD Ismael
Rating: 6.1
Genres: Drama
Director: Marcelo Piñeyro
Writers: Verónica Fernández, Marcelo Figueras
Stars: Mario Casas, Belén Rueda, Sergi López
Storyline
Ismael Tchou (8 years old), takes a train towards Barcelona. He has run away from home because he wants to find Felix, his father, whom he never knew. His only clue is an address of an apartment in Barcelona, written in the return address of a letter to his mother. Once there, he manages to find the apartment, but instead of finding his father, he finds an elegant woman in her fifties, Nora, who happens to be Felix’s mother. Felix never said anything to Nora of the existence of that child. But once she locates him, he does not deny his paternity. Nora, after notice to the child’s mother, Alika, decides to take him to meet Felix. They begin a journey to La Costa Brava, where Felix lives. Meanwhile, Alika and Luis, her husband, travel to the coast in search of the boy. This will make all the characters try to settle their accounts with the past. Written by Anonymous
Details:
Country: Spain
Release Date: 25 December 2013 (Spain)

4 Comments

  1. Everybody thinks that we, the millions that speak Spanish as a first language, are warm, passionate people. But (besides telenovelas, the exception that confirms the rule!) when we make movies or TV series, it seems we're afraid of feeling. We'd rather hide behind violence or lean too much on the cerebral side, as if revealing that we really feel —love, anger, confusion— would be a sin. When on the contrary, it's one of our main graces!

    Ismael is one of that rare, Spanish-speaking movies that allow you to feel without feeling cheap or ashamed. (It seems to be one of Pineyro's talents: have you seen Kamchatka?) Like life, it guides gently you through the whole gamut of emotions, from dark to light, and leaves you at the other side feeling shaken and happy at the same time. It has great actors (that kid is soooo cute without being grating!), subtle music and wonderful vistas.

    It really moved me. And I'm not afraid to show it!

  2. We're all looking for something that eludes us. And many times, that thing we're looking for is a family. (Even if we already have one!) Because family —the perfect family— is at the same time a haven and a preview of our future. "Ismael" is a movie that knows that this world is full of maps, but keeps the essential one as a secret: the map of our own feelings. What are they, really? Which ones are good, and deserve to be nurtured, explored? And how do we deal with all of them?

    "Ismael" is a small Odissey, with a boy of 8 at its core, looking for the same answers we grown ups crave for. And it moves with elegance and humor, carefully avoiding sappiness. It made me feel not only respected as a viewer, but cherished. There are many movies that impose their own feelings on you; "Ismael" is too smart to do that. Marcelo Pineyro, the director, has always shown restraint in his movies, because he counts on the viewer's intelligence.

    This is an delightful film. It will grow on you and take roots. (And by the way: the couple Belen Rueda and Sergi Lopez play deserve their own spin off movie!)

  3. Ismael Tchou (8 years old), takes a train towards Barcelona. He has run away from home because he wants to find Felix, his father, whom he never knew. His only clue is an address of an apartment in Barcelona, written in the return address of a letter to his mother. Once there, he manages to find the apartment, but instead of finding his father, he finds an elegant woman in her fifties, Nora, who happens to be Felix's mother. Felix never said anything to Nora of the existence of that child. But once she locates him, he does not deny his paternity. Nora, after notice to the child's mother, Alika, decides to take him to meet Felix. They begin a journey to La Costa Brava, where Felix lives. Meanwhile, Alika and Luis, her husband, travel to the coast in search of the boy. This will make all the characters try to settle their accounts with the past.

  4. I picked this film up at my local video club with the hope that it would be, at the worst, not bad. I got far more than I had bargained for. This is another one of those films that prove that the Spanish film industry has a lot to say.

    The story is well developed and maintains a steady pace that keeps you glued to the screen. The script is intelligent, interweaving human drama with touches of humour in a very natural way (life and its ups and downs). As to the actors, Belén Rueda is so versatile that she can undertake any role she wants. Once again, it was a real pleasure to watch her filling the role with such naturalness – she doesn't act the part, she IS the part. The rest of the cast performed very well. Larsson do Amaral (Ismael) was perfect for the part. Mario Casas (Félix) took on a difficult role that he filled well. Sergi López (Jordi), whom I didn't know, was an excellent surprise. There were so many nuances in his expressions. Juan Diego Botto (Luis) transmitted well the sufferings of an adoptive father.

    I think it must be the first time I've watched a film that is directed by Marcelo Piñeyro. For me, a discovery. He did an excellent job bringing out the feelings of each actor's role, building a highly human film that I summarise as a "quality film" well worth watching.

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