DVD Dear Mr. Gacy

DVD Dear Mr. Gacy
DVD Dear Mr. Gacy
Run time: 103 min
Rating: 6.5
Genres: Crime | Drama
Director: Svetozar Ristovski
Writers: Kellie Madison, Clark Peterson
Stars: William Forsythe, Jesse Moss, Emma Lahana
Storyline
A chronicle of the interaction between college student Jason Moss and the object of his obsession, serial killer John Wayne Gacy.
Plot Keywords: serial killer, obsession, bare chested male, transvestite prostitute, decomposed body
Details:
Country: Canada
Release Date: 11 May 2010 (Canada)

4 Comments

  1. I wasn't sure I wanted to watch another moralistic 'movie-of-the-week' about a serial killer since they are usually whitewashed beyond recognition to make them palatable to mainstream America.

    When I found out this was based on the true story of a college student contacting John Wayne Gacy in prison before he was executed, however, I thought I would give it a chance.

    It all starts like a 'docudrama' by the look of the cast, but with the first glimpse of the gritty characterization of Jason's mother, this film took on a much edgier realism than I was expecting. It seemed to me that I had not seen a woman like this before – not pretty, not likable, not whitewashed.

    In fact, none of the characters were Hollywood suburban – they were conflicted, vulnerable, angry, manipulative and contradictory. And, 'Jason Moss' takes us on a journey that seems ordinary at first, but step by step, the tension ramps up and we soon find ourselves betting against higher and higher stakes on a happy ending.

    What we end up experiencing is an intense and uncomfortable story that goes far deeper into the psyche of Gacy and anyone who came into contact with him than the usual fare. The acting is superb on everyone's part, especially Jesse Moss and William Forsythe – so much so that I had a hard time connecting to the pix of the real people at the end of the film.

    This is one of the best studies of serial murderers that I have ever seen. Watch it but be prepared to go places that aren't 'nice'. People are much scarier than we care to believe – an idea that John Wayne Gacy used skillfully to entrap his victims up until the end.

  2. For a college term paper, a rather naive young man named Jason Moss (played by actor improbably named Jesse Moss) decides to interview notorious, real-life serial killer John Wayne Gacy (William Forsythe). The story, which is true, is set in the early 1990s.

    Gacy was convicted in 1980 of killing over thirty Chicago area boys and young men in the 1970s, and was on death row when Moss sent Gacy the initial written inquiry. Through the plot, the two correspond via letter and talk on the phone. Eventually, Gacy arranges for a personal visit from Moss.

    Jason comes across as smart, ambitious, and a bit smug and cocky. At no time does he express any genuine interest in Gacy as a person. Instead, Jason hopes to gain the confidence of Gacy so as to learn details about Gacy's experiences that law enforcement and the FBI were unable to learn. Jason's motives are thus somewhat selfish, and aimed at furthering his own academic career. I really didn't much sympathize with him or his tactics. And of course Gacy, the killer who dressed up as a clown, was truly evil. In short, there's no one to root for in this film.

    This is an unusual movie in that close-up camera shots of characters comprise much, if not most, of the scenes. Lighting is conventional. The film offers little in the way of suspense. It comes across as a TV docu-drama. Casting and acting are acceptable.

    For viewers interested in true crime stories, "Dear Mr. Gacy" offers a strange after-the-fact twist to a dreadful episode. And at the film's very end, the script makes a startling revelation about one of the real-life characters.

  3. This is a difficult movie to watch. I rented it over the holiday week for entertainment.

    I felt the movie draws the viewer into the emotional sea of conflict and any flick that can do that, in my estimation is superior.

    Certain parts are very difficult because they deal with sexuality , ciminiality and morals all at once.

    The flick should not be rejected simply because it might to thought to be anti-gay. There were parts that I thought could pander to homophobic people.

    I would recommend it and advise imagine you are 18 years old and dealing with a psychological experiment where you become the bait for the vampire.

  4. Jason Moss (played by Jesse Moss, no relation), a college student attending UNLV, corresponds with serial killer John Wayne Gacy (William Forsythe),convicted of murdering 33 young men and boys, while on death row. They get closer and closer to each other… and each getting inside the other's head.

    This film was very highly anticipated by me. I had actually corresponded with many (31) serial killers from 2001-2003, and was familiar with Moss' book. I had found it to be full of ego-stroking and gross exaggerations. Other reviews I read seemed to agree with me, and I was frankly disappointed that Moss went on to intern with the Secret Service, as I felt he was a hack. I hoped the film would correct some of this.

    The film was developed with screenwriter Kellie Madison (her first script) and producer Clark Peterson ("Monster") along with interaction from Moss, at least up until his suicide on 6/6/06. They got permission from his widow, Charlotte, to go ahead, and made the film as we can see it today. Personally, I think they did a brilliant job. Some of the scenes (with the male hooker and the final confrontation, for example) are probably dubious, but they relate to the book. So, as far as adaptations go, it is pretty strong.

    I had the pleasure to speak with Barry Boschelli, a lifelong friend of John Wayne Gacy, before seeing this film. You can see some clips of Barry in the special features. He not only told me some great stories about Gacy (which you can read in his book), but praised William Forsythe for his accuracy in the portrayal of Gacy. If Barry says Forsythe was great, who am I to argue? I thought so, too, and it seems to be supported.

    I hope this movie brings more light to the life of Jason Moss. I would like to see a biography of him. What did his brother, parents and wife think of his adventures? His girlfriend in the film… was she a real person? Did his professor find this accurate? Menard prison? What more can be learned about his suicide and the date he chose to kill himself?

    I would recommend this film, without a doubt, for anyone who read the book, whether you enjoyed it or not. I would also recommend it for any fan or student of John Wayne Gacy. The accuracy is debatable, but I think the film is a valuable piece that deserves to be in your library. And any fan of William Forsythe… he does not get the credit he deserves often enough. This may be his stand-out role.

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